Category: Grow

SubCool’s Super Soil

This is SubCool’s super soil recipe and how to use it.

The first step is to mix the ingredients very well. You don’t want any ‘ hot pockets ‘. Next, the mix needs to be put into containers and stored above freezing for 6+ weeks. If a white web forms on top you can leave it or simply till it into the soil. This is the beneficial bacteria and fungi at work.

When using this soil remember it is very ‘hot’ or full of nutrients. This mean you only need to fill about the bottom 2 inches of your pot with it. The rest should be the potting soil base you used to make the mix. This also means that you will only have to use water for the life of your plant!

SubCool’s Super Soil

  • 8 1.5 cubic foot organic soil (Roots Organic preferred)
  • 33+ lbs Earth Worm Castings
  • 2.5 lbs Fish Bone Meal
  • 2.5 lbs Bone Meal
  • 5 lbs High Phosphorus Bat Guano
  • 5 lbs Blood Meal
  • 5 Cups Oyster Shell
  • 3 Cups Kelp Meal
  • 3 Cups Alfalfa Meal
  • 3/4 cup Epsom Salt
  • 1 Cup Dolomite Lime
  • 2 Cup Azomite
  • 2Tbsp Powdered Humic Acid

Instagram: SubCool420

Website: SubCool.com

Advertisements

Growing in Soil: A brief overview

Soil, This is where most people start. It is what they are most familiar with. Everyone has seen or handled garden soil. It it a peat moss base with additives and usually some perlite.

We recommend using a organic soil like Fox Farms or Roots organic. These can be found at your local hydro store, ace hardware and in some states I’ve even heard Walmart has Fox Farms products. Point being these are quality products that are fairly easy to find.

Soil is great for many reasons. It does not have to watered every day. Less or no liquid nutrients are required with soil. The plants can and need to go days between watering. The cherry on top is liquid nutrients only need to be used every 2-3 waterings. This means less water usage, less nutrient usage, more time tending to your plants and more money in your pocket.

The primary draw back of soil however is over watering and yield. One of the most common mistakes new growers make is too much water or watering too frequently. The yield with soil tends to be lower then the yield with soilless or hydroponics.

Soil is a great medium indoor and the only medium I would use outdoors. It’s very forgiving to the grower.

Soil is the best medium to grow organically. When using the soil food web you maximize the potential of the plant by mimicking what happens in nature. If you want to learn more about the soil food web then check out the book Teaming with Microbes.

This has been a brief overview of soil. Check back with us later as we dive a little deeper into soil, organics, and super soil.

Cannabis Books to Read

You want to grow cannabis? You want to just learn more about this amazing plant?
Here are a few books that will help any level of cannabis user.

The Cannabis Grow Bible by Greg Green
This is a great place to start if you want to learn how to grow cannabis. This book may be a little out of date when it comes to new techniques but this book provides a solid foundation for any grower.

Teaming with Microbes by Jeff Lowenfels
This book is more the more advanced gardener. This book explains how plants take in food in a organic setting. If you want to grow in soil this is a must read. If you want to grow with hydroponics then this is still a helpful book to understand the function of plants.

Teaming with Nutrients by Jeff Lowenfels
This is a follow up book to “Teaming with Microbes”. This book gets even more in depth with how plants take in nutrients.

The Cannabis Encyclopedia by Jose Cervantes
This book is a all inclusive grow book. This book has information on growing indoors, outdoors, in a green house. This book also offers techniques. Jose book also teaches about HID and LED lighting. The best part about this book is all the techniques are tried and true.
These are just a few of many books about cultivating cannabis and spreading the healing of this amazing plant. Thank you for reading check back in with us tomorrow for more.

MammothP Review

Lets start the year off right with a review of an amazing product for any garden. You heard that right ANY garden.

This product is MammothP. This product is a bacteria that makes more phosphorus available to the plant. This is important because out of our NPK the ‘P’ or phosphorus is our macro nutrient that helps create those big full flowers.

This product can be used in any medium. Soil. Coco. Rock wool. Hydro.

The average gardner will not use a lot of MammothP. Since the max dosage is about 2ml per gallon. With such low dosage rates and such helpful returns. Up to 16%. That’s a lot. Last I heard co2 caused a 20% increase. We all spend a obscene amount of money on co2. Why not a bacteria?

Moral of the story. If you’re not using MammothP buy some now. It will only improve what you are already doing.

Product website:

https://mammothmicrobes.com

Amazon:

MammothP

Bottled Organics

What is organic gardening? A hardcore organic gardener will say ‘anything that comes out of a bottle is not organic’. But those with a little more slack still consider OMRI or CDFA approved organic. Then there are those that will say its ‘organic’ . When truthfully it is just organic based. Today we are here to talk about bottled organics though, all of which are intended to be used with soil.

There are several OMRI approved bottles and amendments on the market.  One of the more popular organic bottle lines on the market is BioBizz. They have a full line of OMRI organic bottles that come with a custom feeding schedule. These are tried and true. So much so that you can find them at most if not all of the High Times Magazine events.

One of the most popular nutrient brands in the world, Advanced Nutrients, has a entire line of CFDA approved bottles. These even include a organic version of their popular sugar, bud candy, and their popular bloom booster, big bud.

Aurora Innovations or more popularly known as roots organic is a CDFA approved bottle and dry amendment line. There are dry amendment for grow, bloom, and foundation (or micro). There is also a grow and bloom bottle. On top of this there are all the bottled additives your plant could desire. Roots organic goes the extra mile by providing a bagged coco/peat mix medium that pairs up very well with their in depth feeding schedule.

General Hydroponics has a “organic line” that is called General Organics. This line is not OMRI or CDFA approved. A more appropriate name for this line would ‘Generally Organic’. There are organic materials used to make these products but there are also chemicals. Don’t believe us? Look on the back of the bottle next time you buy fertilizer. If there are any words that end in ‘-ate’. Then you have chemicals in your bottles.

This is just a brief overview of a few of the more popular organic bottled nutrients that are available on the market. We hope this helps you on your search for bottled organics.